Why Porn-Induced Erectile Dysfunction (PIED) Is Bad For Penis Enlargement

Written by Mike and Jeff on January 2, 2016

Why you should care about Porn-Induced Erectile Dysfunction (PIED)

We’ll tell you point blank why you need to care about porn-related erectile dysfunction:

  1. It affects your blood flow to your penis which is important for penis enlargement. Remember, stretching by itself doesn’t grow your penis. It’s the healing of the micro-tears that creates growth. This is done when the nutrient-rich blood is delivered to the penis.
  2. It determines whether or not you can get hard when it’s time to have sex (Yes, even porn stars know which of their male co-workers has PIED because no matter what they do, they can’t get them hard).
  3. It determines whether you’ll be able to reach your max size. For example, say you gain 0.7 inches from penis enlargement. But you can only produce an 80% erection. This means you’re not even using the gains you achieved!

woman not able to satisfy man

Ask yourself this:

  • How many times do you watch porn a week?
  • How many times do you masturbate to orgasm with porn?
  • Do you need porn to get hard?
  • Can you get hard without porn (using your imagination)?
  • How confident you are getting a 100% erection when you meet up to have sex?
  • If you do watch porn, do you feel you have to search through multiple videos before finally settling on one?

man watching pornography

Evidence increasingly suggests that failing to get and maintain a full erection may be one of the side effects of PIED, and it is turning into a more common problem of men's sexual health.

One survey of 28,000 Italian men found that "excessive consumption" of porn, starting at age 14, and daily consumption in their early to mid-20s, desensitized men to even the most violent images. According to the head of the Italian Society of Andrology and Sexual Medicine, this can cause male sexual dysfunction by lowering libido and eventually leading to an inability to get an erection.

"Due to the pornography available on the Internet, we are finding out that this type of sex dysfunction is a real entity," said David B. Samadi, MD, chairman of the urology department and chief of robotic surgery at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City. "It is a problem in the brain, not the penis."

To some extent, porn-related ED can affect anyone, but Dr. Samadi said he sees it mainly in younger men who are in their teens and early 20s.

Benchmark research from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health in Baltimore found that about 18 million American men have ED, meaning they're unable to achieve or maintain an erection sufficient for sexual intercourse.

frustrated man with woman in bed

Are You at Risk for Porn-Related ED?

It’s not necessarily how much porn a person watches. The type can also play a role, Samadi said. Unlike the soft-core porn images seen in such magazines as Playboy or Penthouse, online pornography is generally more graphic and often depicts kinky, deviant, or even violent behavior. It's also available 24/7.

Porn can lead to unrealistic expectations that increase a person’s tolerance for sex. Samadi likened the phenomenon to what occurs when someone consistently drinks more and more alcohol. Eventually, that person has a harder time feeling inebriated. The same happens with porn and sexual performance.

"You need more and more stimulation as you build up this tolerance, and then comes your reality with a wife or partner, and you may not be able to perform," he said. Too much porn can desensitize a man to sex, and, eventually, he can be unable to get excited by ordinary sexual encounters, Samadi explained.

Chronic porn consumption can cause a shift in brain chemicals that may contribute to organic erectile dysfunction, said Dr. Mirza. "Your expectations become much higher than normal," he said. "If you look at any porn video image, they are magnified. This is not what the normal anatomy looks like."

your brain on porn

Samadi agreed. "Many of the images seen in porn are unrealistic and magnified," he said. "No one can go on for hours."

"'Reel' life is very different than real life," said Nicole Sachs, LCSW, a social worker in Rehoboth, Del., and the author of "The Meaning of Truth." The unrealistic imagery seen in some pornography can make men or women feel self-conscious, which could lead to problems with sexual function or intimacy, she said.

"What seems so easy when watching porn takes work in real life," she said. "Sex in pornography or even with prostitutes is quick, easy, and impersonal," she said. "Intimacy is hard and can be embarrassing." Queuing up the porn may seem like the easy way out, but this can lead to a vicious cycle. "Impotence begets impotence, and interest in porn can grow from there," she explained.

What Is the Treatment for Porn-Related ED?

Porn-related ED is not treated with drugs designed to help men achieve an erection, said Samadi. "Medications are not the treatment for this because the problem is not the penis, it’s the brain," he said. "There is a mismatch between the brain and penis, so you may get the erection with these medications, but not the satisfaction."

Samadi first takes a history to find out what may be responsible for the ED. "Shame and guilt may play a role if someone is watching lot of pornography, so I always talk to the individuals separately," he said.

Treatment is similar to a 12-step recovery program, he said. It starts with a 4- to 6-week plan to desensitize certain receptors in the brain. Talk therapy also helps address some of the underlying issues. "We also encourage men spend more time with a partner," he said. "We try to have [partners] touch one another, reconnect, and slowly build the relationship back up."

Here at PhalloGauge.com, for those guys who lack a partner, we also have a fantastic guide for men on how to efficiently get laid off the popular mobile dating app Tinder.

your brain on porn

It’s not a simple fix, Sachs added. "Sex is half in your head and half in your body, and it takes work to treat the psychological component," she said. "There is no pill to treat these issues."

A 28-year old heals his chronic copulatory impotence.

The issue lies not in viewers' perfectly healthy penises, but in their brain's reward circuitry—and there is no quick fix. Normal dopamine sensitivity in the reward circuitry is critical to normal sexual responsiveness, and too much stimulation appears to weaken the dopamine response of many brains. To return to normal, the brain needs time to reboot, without extreme stimulation.

To illustrate, here are a man's comments about his journey back to erectile health:

[Week three of no porn, masturbation or orgasm] For years, I looked at porn and masturbated to multiple orgasms at least once a day, beginning during high school. At university, I was a computer nerd with glasses and no social life, though I played a lot of sport. I'd stay in my room and study, play guitar or masturbate. I got pretty good at all these things.

I got an IT job, and once I could afford my own cable Internet connection, the floodgates opened. With unlimited access to high quality porn 24/7, I'd stay up till 4 a.m. and get up at the crack of noon. Some months I binged so much that I exceeded my Internet quota and received bills of $1000. I used to have 5-10 windows of streaming video open at a time, and bounce between them, which really upped the levels of arousal. This pattern continued throughout my early twenties. I was not happy at all, and my doctor diagnosed me with depression.

Porn temporarily took my desire away, so I thought it was a good thing, keeping me "balanced." I was proud that I could look at a hot girl on the street and not feel the slightest hint of arousal because porn had desensitized me. It was a way of taking back the power that I believed women had over me. Only much later did I realize how destructive this was.

Most of what I'd learned at school, in the media and on the Internet said masturbation, and even porn, are healthy. All the guys I knew were into it, so I never so it occurred to me how abnormal it actually is in contrast with a natural sex life. As far as I knew, masturbation had no downside, and viewing porn was just something all guys do all the time. Many of my friends still have this view.

When I finally lost my virginity at 23, my first time was terrible. I was semi-hard, nervous and nothing was working. I did not enjoy it at all, and I'm sure my ex-girlfriend would say the same. I did love her, but I'd been training my nervous system to respond sexually another way for so long, it was like my body didn't know what to do. Our sex life was one of the main reasons we broke up after a couple of years. I was watching porn a lot the whole time. Now, I realize that I was sabotaging our relationship, but at the time I blamed her. She did have problems of her own, but didn't deserve all the blame. In my defense, I honestly didn't know any better.

Since then, I've had sex, but I've never really been able to relax and enjoy it. I'm always nervous, and frequently have problems getting an erection. My last orgasm was at the hands of a Chinese massage girl and even then, I had trouble orgasming. She was pretty and had an attractive body, but it took a long time for me to orgasm, and she almost gave up. This is just one example of how I've shorted-circuited my ability to become aroused through normal means.

A hot girl could be naked with legs spread on the bed in front of me, and I'd still need some sort of manual stimulation to get hard. This really scares me. I want my libido back. I want to feel normal again. I want to be connected with the rest of the world and enjoy my life. I've been using porn to escape, and I'm convinced it played a significant part in causing my past depression.

Last year, I had a decent attempt at quitting porn and noticed improvements. But I was still masturbating and reading erotica during that time. This current effort is the first time I've actually tried going without any orgasm or externally arousing stimuli, and I feel that this is the key. It seems like total abstinence would speed the recovery process. I would also point out that I'm 28 and pretty healthy physically and emotionally, and my diet is pretty clean. I'm working out regularly. I don't smoke. I do drink to excess on the weekends though.

flat lineThe strange thing is that it hasn't been hard to stop, once I made the decision. Apart from mild headaches and restless sleep, I haven't had the withdrawal symptoms many people mention. Instead, I feel nothing. It's like I just don't have a libido. No morning wood. No wet dreams. No spontaneous erections. No cravings. Haven't been horny. I've had opportunities to have sex but my body is not responding. I'm taking tango classes, so I'm reasonably social but still no sign of my libido. I can dance with a beautiful girl and have no physical reaction whatsoever. I'm aware cerebrally that a girl is attractive, but I don't feel it physically.

The thing that keeps me going with the abstinence is my faith that I'll be able to reboot my brain and get back to normal. But it's frustrating.

[Six weeks later] This week marks a turning point in my recovery process. Before I go on, I need to describe the girl from tango dancing. She's tall, green eyes (I love green eyes), great body, and cool as hell. She's really street smart and down to earth and can hold a conversation about heaps of things. She just wants to have fun, which is exactly what I need right now.

I think it's safe to say my libido is back, but it was eight weeks of no porn, masturbation or erotica, and minimal fantasy. My goal was to make it to a wet dream, as an indication that my body was beginning to respond normally. I never made it. Last week, I had an externally stimulated orgasm with a Thai massage girl. Part of me wishes I'd waited, just out of curiosity to see how long it would have taken. But then my goal is to have a healthy sex life again, not wet dreams.

Other than that incident, it was straight abstinence. [When I finally had sex with the girl I met at tango class], there was no erectile dysfunction (ED). I was hard without her touching me downstairs. We had sex multiple times, so on the second and third time I needed a little "help," but there was no ED as such. The fourth time we'd waited a few hours, and I got hard with no help, just by being turned on. So I think it's safe to say I'm getting legitimate, unassisted erections now.

I've also realized is that sex is not a performance...it's about two people connecting and having fun. I think it's going to take quite a while to unlearn all the crap that I absorbed from watching porn, which is not what sex is about at all. I know what to focus on now though; I really tried to make the session as slow and sensual as possible, with lots of caressing and touching. So, I think that it is just a matter of time and practicing real sex with real women.

dancing salsa, I think I understand things better now: When you haven't eaten in a while, your brain starts releasing dopamine, which makes you crave food. This is a survival response to encourage you to seek out food, so the body doesn't starve to death. When you're full, your brain shuts this off and you no longer crave food. If you're constantly abusing this mechanism by binging on food, your brain lowers its sensitivity to dopamine and the associated triggers. This actually encourages you to binge more to get the same feeling. Porn works in the same way. Food and sex aren't bad, but if you binge, you'll upset your brain's natural dopamine levels and receptor count, and that's what causes addiction. I now think of porn as "junk food for the brain". Porn and junk food seem to have very similar brain effects.

[These next remarks were written in response to another man's request for advice.] I'm guessing that speed of recovery varies due to several factors:

How to Cure Porn-Induced Erectile Dysfunction

Do these steps in the following order.

  1. No porn, no masturbation, no orgasm
  2. No porn, masturbation but no orgasm
  3. No porn, no masturbation, orgasm by other means (e.g. with a partner)
  4. No porn, masturbation to orgasm
  5. Tapering off porn, no masturbation, no orgasm
  6. Tapering off porn, masturbation but no orgasm
  7. Tapering off porn, no masturbation, orgasm by other means (e.g. with a partner)
  8. Tapering off porn, masturbation to orgasm

The difference between the first and last methods in terms of average recovery time could be 2-3 months versus 2-3 years.


The PhalloGauge Team will answer all questions/comments you may have.

Feel free to leave a comment as an anonymous guest!

The comments section is moderated for spam.